Mourning Dove Studio Blog

It doesn’t have to be an endless marathon

When I moved to Boston in 1980 I was quite surprised and pleased to find out that I had a new holiday to enjoy! Patriots’ Day is always the 3rd Monday in April.  My town, Arlington, was the scene of the bloodiest fighting on the first day of the American Revolution.  There’s a parade, a re-enactment of one of the battles, and tours of our historic house.  And – Paul Revere and William Dawes ride through town on horseback again.  Yup. I love it, and Boston is pretty keen on remembering all the history that took place in our area,  Yet, frankly, to most of us around here Patriots’ Day is thought of as the Boston Marathon Day.   When in college studying for a career in rehabilitation, my friends and I were part of an official group handing water to the wheelchair marathoners. We’d start running as someone approached [link to read more…]

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Planning Ahead: Resources

By bringing death out in the open, by witnessing it, talking about it, learning about it, and trying in whatever way we can to accept it as an inevitable part of our lives, we can be better prepared, we can make better decisions when the time comes, and we can change the way we die [AND LIVE]– for ourselves and for our loved ones.                              -Talking About Death Won’t Kill You                               by Virginia Morris For this last post of our series Planning Ahead, we’ve gathered all the resources mentioned throughout into one list: Resources 1. Mourning Dove Studio website 2. Mourning Dove Studio Tribute Ideas 3. Post #1 April 21 – Introduction (structure it in) 4. Post #2 April 22 – Planning [link to read more…]

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Planning Ahead: Your Last Words

Planning Ahead: Your Last Words

-You’ve written down your choices and wishes for the way your survivors for your after-death care. That’s such a gift to them! Emotions can run all over the place after a death – this is normal – but that means it’s a set-up for painful conflict if there’s disagreement as to how to honor and express our love for someone who’s died. A lot of our feelings during this time can get parked in the Guilt area. So If it’s true for you, writing down something like this is also a gift: These are my wishes, and I know you’ll do your best to honor them. But if for any reason at all that’s not possible, you don’t need to feel guilty. I love you and I know that you love me. –The Four Things that Matter Most by Ira Byock This well-respected doctor of palliative care distilled his experiences into [link to read more…]

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Terminal Case

Planning Ahead: Talking with Others

The Conversation Project encourages families to talk about advanced care directives, that is, what kinds and levels of medical interventions someone would want for themselves. Their free, beautiful Starter Kits start off by asking us to think about our values and what’s important to us as the basis for proceeding to deal with possible situations.  It’s the perfect beginning to thinking about the after-death care choices, as well, by combining the first 2 pages of the starter kit with the questions in your planning guide.   As previous posts in this series have pointed out, aligning after-death care with our values and what’s important to us makes the whole thing meaningful and less paralyzing.  When people value caring for the environment, for example, learning about natural burial can open up a conversation. Talking About Death Won’t Kill You by Virginia Morris, can help, and help a lot. I wish I’d been able to [link to read more…]

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